In Regulatory Notice 21-26 (July 15, 2021), FINRA amended the filing requirements of Rules 5122 and 5123 to require members to file with FINRA any “retail communications,” as defined in FINRA Rule 2210, that promote or recommend private placement offerings. FINRA Rule 5122 covers private placements of securities issued by a FINRA member, while Rule

Rule 502(c) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), prohibits an issuer from offering or selling securities by any form of general solicitation or general advertising when conducting certain offerings exempt from registration under the safe harbors provided under Regulation D of the Securities Act. Many have felt that, over the

As part of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s amendments to the exempt offering framework, which amendments became effective in March 2021, the SEC, among other things, aligned the bad actor disqualification provisions in Regulation A, Regulation D, and Regulation CF.  Our updated resource provides an overview of the bad actor disqualification provisions applicable in connection

Last week, the updated form to be used by placement agents in connection with private placements that is required to be filed with FINRA pursuant to Rule 5123 became effective.  As we had previously blogged, FINRA has amended the filer form in connection with private placements by adding additional questions.  In addition, the updated

FINRA filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed amendments to the private placement filer form that members complete in connection with private placement filings made pursuant to either Rule 5122 or Rule 5123.  The proposed changes to the filer form are proposed for immediate effectiveness, with an anticipated implementation date of May 22,

Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) Rules 5122 (private placements of securities issued by member firms) and 5123 (private placements of securities) each require a FINRA member to file with the FINRA advertising department any private placement memorandum, term sheet or other offering document that discloses the intended use of the offering proceeds, the offering

In the International Financial Law Review’s latest publication, A Deep Dive Into Capital Raising Alternatives, Mayer Brown provides context on the changes in market structure and market dynamics that led to the enactment of the JOBS Act. Specifically, the trend for many private companies to remain private longer, defer or dispense with traditional

July 16-17, 2020
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This two day program will provide an in-depth review of the basic aspects of the U.S. federal securities laws. Emphasis will be placed on the interplay among the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Act, the JOBS Act, the securities-related provisions

The article, part of the Thomson Reuters Practical Law Global Guides to Debt Capital Markets Law and Equity Capital Markets Law, examines the various exemptions available for the resale of restricted and control securities under the US Securities Act of 1933 (as amended), the conditions applicable to the use of these exemptions and other relevant

Section 926 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd Frank”) requires the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) to adopt rules that would make the exemption from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (“Securities Act”) provided by Rule 506 of Regulation D thereof unavailable for any securities offering in which certain